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fear

Fear.


This past couple of weeks have been some of the most challenging weeks of my life from my motherhood and business point of view.


I have been extremely exposed...fear of pain and uncertainty for my child, emotional pain of seeing as a business owner, other not fun business lessons,  bike accidents, sick kids, new staff, and an up and coming expansion…


A lot of unknowns and my ego getting ripped up and anxiety triggers of unrealistic understanding of reality…


All in a week.  And I’m not in a great place.  I’m actually pretty freaked out...and yet through all of my irrational responses to moments of uncertainty, I knew I needed to reset.  So I’m writing to you.


In fact, most of my newsletters are not inspired by problems around me, but imbalances within.


I certainly have a high level of resilience.  High level of fighting through the ease of comfort, but sometimes life does get the best of me and I get pretty bummed and then I bouce back.  I try not to be stuck in my understanding of the presence and move forward when it is clear that the irritations of lessons are invisible high school English teachers...Poking you to analyze, revise, read more closely, and say it without excess.


English teachers always gave me much more than simply learning the art in the English language, so I played with this idea of grappling with emotional responses and our ability to reflect.


Like I said...analyze, revise, read more closely, and say it without excess.


Analyze what really is happening.  It is YOU. Completely. You can’t know others the way you know yourself and if that means leading with empathy instead of self imposed confusion then do that.  Your fear can make you self preserve instead of grow. Shift to growing. Shift to finding your loving response to yourself and others.  


Revise how you are responding...PLEASE FEEL.  Discomfort is a lesson, however, revise what that discomfort is making you do.  Find a diffuser. Neutralize pain’s power over your perception of reality. Break it up.  Read a book. Walk. Recognize that action unless love filled will not work as quickly or effectively in the long run.


Read more closely to your wisdom.  You know way more than you think, but rarely do you really trust intuition of love.  We can be impulsive. Full of fear. Inactive. Angry. Mean. But, that isn’t the complexity of your influence in the world or in yourself.  Ride the wave of endorphins when you feel like you have found a truth. Feel warm when you problem solve.  


Then when you find a solution say it without excess.  Don’t fill your head or those around you with pomp and circumstance...just find the words after the pain is felt.  Simplicity and being concise is the best way to communicate complexity...to yourself and to others.


Rinse and repeat =)


Do you have other ways?


E


30 Days of Uncertainty

30 Days of uncertainty!


The next 30 days I would like you to focus on uncertain moments and how you handle them.  


What is uncertainty to you?

Why is it so bad?

Why is it so uncomfortable?

Aren’t all things uncertain?

Who are you to know?

Is control a necessity to peace?

When have you known for sure that you were balanced and perfect?

Have you ever been?

How have you developed your sense of expectations, goals?

Why have you?


This is just a start, but a worthwhile thought exercise to tear open some understanding of the impossibility of perfection and certainty.


Prove them wrong!

Erin


finally...

Finally...the first version of my Journal.


About a year ago I created a planner and journal for my clients and members to use, and the first version is finally here.  Download a print off by responding with “yes, please” and enjoy my strategy on feeling a comprehensive sense of progress when it is easy to get distracted on where we are not.


I think dreaming and reminding ourselves of all of our “parts” is essential to our truth.  Deficit thinking, while productive, has an effect on our spirit. Many times, there is a lot happening that is amazing, but we look at what is NOT currently indicative of our effort, our dreams, our strengths and this somehow defines our entire life for the moment.  


No amount of self talk can take us out of stress mode when we define our entire life based off of a moment of change or uncertainty.


So recognize ALL your parts.  Write down in an accompanying journal what makes you feel the most energized.


Next I have “personal dreams.”  These are my ideals for how I want to feel progress for myself (professional, personal).


Self Care dreams are my ideals for caring for myself.  I include exercise, movement, nutrition, stress breakers, etc.


Family is how I interact with my family and how we develop our own plans and presence.


Travel is a personal love of mine.  I like to be out of my element to keep a complex sense of truth inside of my head.  It keeps me pleasantly unclear.


Talents and creativity are meant to be for the individual that has an art that they love!  Reading, writing, playing an instrument, speaking, language, craft, etc. Keep this a part of you!!  Boredom happens when we lose aesthetic and creative challenge.


Thoughts on society is healthy as it keeps my perspective in check.  Social media makes people seem mean and I think to maintain a sense of love towards life, you can’t write out the world.  You have to find empathy and authority balance. This would be a place for that monthly reflection and outlet.


Ideal day is how I would structure my time to feel complete.  Where my attentions would go. How I would use my energy. Monthly assessment is a necessity.


My Ideal Connection is most important.  The energy you use is the energy you make.  




Finally, I include reflection.  SO MUCH REFLECTION and explanation.  You can’t know your effect without truly thinking about it.  Do it all the time. Write about what has happened and how it changed you and vice versa.


This is a work in progress, but something finally put together.


Fear first, right?


I think creating a monthly way to see yourself comprehensively is interesting and a way to pass down your authenticity =)


Enjoy.


E


6-Packs and Athleticism: Social Media vs Reality

6-Packs and Athleticism: Social Media vs Reality

Check out our video on training abdominals here!

One of the most frequently asked questions from our athletes is how to achieve the six pack abs that are seemingly everywhere you look.  Unfortunately, this thought process is focussed solely on the visual and very little on the abdominal strength required to move heavy loads and change direction more efficiently.  In reality, there are 3 separate layers of abdominal musculature that play different roles in stability and athleticism. The three layers in order of discussion are the rectus abdominis, the obliques, and finally the transverse abdominis.  As you read on, consider your own views on abs and whether your way of thinking is helping you to meet your athletic goals.

The first layer of abdominals is referred to as the Rectus Abdominis (RA).  These muscles are the “washboard abs” that so many dream of having. The primary role of the RA is to flex the spine (think about your typical sit-up or crunch).  While the RA plays a small role in preventing extended posture (bubble butt), their larger role in athletic performance is relatively small. In fact, the visual appeal of these abs is primarily achieved through nutrition. With that said, visible ridges in your abs can be symbolic of your body fat percentage, which may need to change depending on your sport’s requirements.  While a football-playing offensive lineman and a cross country athlete may be polar opposite in appearance, it does not mean that the runner has strong abs.

While the rectus abdominis makes up the most clearly visible layer of the abs, the obliques come in as a close second.  The obliques are comprised of an outer, external layer, as well as an internal layer below them with muscle fibers running in the opposite direction.  This “X” shape created by the obliques plays a significant role in supporting the spine and allowing us to stand upright. The obliques also provide stability during side bending and rotation of your torso.  When your coaches talk about getting 360-degree expansion with you brace, the obliques make up a big portion of the area you are trying to fill with air. The obliques work in conjunction with the third layer of the abs, the transverse abdominis, to create intra-abdominal pressure (the pressure you create with your breathing), the most important aspect of athletic stabilization.

The final, and arguably the most important layer of the abdominals is the transverse abdominis.  The TA sits deepest inside the body and refers to the muscles we are trying to activate when your coach tells you to brace against a belly breath or shrink your ribcage.  There is a part of the TA below each of the muscles mentioned above, almost acting as the glue the holds everything else together. While this layer sits deepest into the body and is therefor invisible to the naked eye, it’s proof that there is far more to strong abs than the stereotypical beach body.  

There exists a saying in the athletic world that proximal stability will allow for distal mobility.  What this technical expression means is that if your abs are stable, you allow for your hips, shoulders, and everything farther away from the middle of your body to function optimally.  If you as an athlete can learn to breath and brace efficiently, you have the potential to move safely and become significantly more athletic. Stop worrying about the six pack and start thinking about the success you want on the court or field.

Reference Photos:

Rectus Abdominis: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/95/Rectus_abdominis.png/250px-Rectus_abdominis.png

Obliques and RA:

http://www.balancemotion.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/PicMonkey-Collage-300x211.jpg

Transverse Abdominis:

https://www.verywellhealth.com/thmb/acZh8HH7glUvQSp4P80dvsQ32ms=/768x0/filters:no_upscale():max_bytes(150000):strip_icc()/GettyImages-87307057-56a0601f3df78cafdaa14e0c.jpg