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basketball training bloomington indiana

permission to quit

I was listening to Rachel Hollis’ book, Girl, Wash Your Face.  Side--This book is great for people in romantic relationships. It is a great way to communicate and it is entertaining.  Highly recommend!


At the beginning of the book she discusses the promises we break with ourselves comparing it to trusting someone in your life who always breaks plans with you or seems to always over promise and underdeliver.  It begins to have a diminishing effect. You can’t trust. You can’t believe. You can’t assume. When this happens with yourself, what can you do?


Hollis likes to call our moments of tension as opportunities to quit.


She claims that when we decide to use our trained (comfortable) self to answer actions to hardships, we essentially are quitting.


That every excuse we make for ourselves is permission to quit.


She then movingly yells at the readers she would not give people permission to quite specifically when it comes to the challenges of self-care, dreams, and the road ahead towards change.


I am yelling too.


A lot of people think that I am missing mindfulness--especially working with young people and families.  That I am too hard. Have too many expectations. All unrealistic. That I don’t listen to the world around us telling us to stop pushing. 


But there are two types of energies when it comes to our dreams--ways to fuel and ways to progress.


Our fuel--our sense of self and fullness--comes in many different ways, most of which none of us care to engage with.  It’s our attention to our health. Our ability to ask for help. Identifying the isolating effect of perfection. Somehow self care has been disguised as inaction for fear of “busyness” and I call bologna.  Sense of self is recognizing your health and well being...not just stopping. It is foundational and it commands community. Identification of value--individually and collectively.  


On the flip--progress towards goals demands a maturity that embraces a little chaos.  A lot of trust in imperfection. A lot of discomfort. A lot of vulnerability.


IF we begin making excuses in ourselves, giving ourselves permission to not embrace the collective storytelling of progress, we will stagnate and become overwhelmed by our own self judgement.


YES.  Absolutely a problem.  


But finding enough love in yourself, those around you, and an attention to uncertainty that scares you a little...you are on the path of strength.


Stop giving yourself excuses and start giving yourself a community, a cup full of love, and the chip on your shoulder to try uncertainty.


E


30 Days of Self care

30 Days of self-care


What does self care look and feel like?  It feels like a warm feeling that comes when you matter to you and you do it often.


Misinterpretations that get a bad rep?


Weight as indicative of value

Inaction due to overwhelm

Cheat days as a way to not care about your goals 

Perpetual restarting as though a restart is different than just starting the day as YOU

Prioritizing as time is indicative of rest

Productivity is indicative of anxiety

Criticizing the world around as though it somehow is the only catalyst of challenge


I found this great calendar which I am sharing at the top of the page and I think it is so important to be deeply aware of your self care.  


Are you loving yourself, approaching yourself as special and important?  Or are you building your self care with the idea that you are somehow not complete?


I think there is a misconception of the fitness industry...that somehow it builds on the perpetuity of negative self image, but that is a small part of the negativity surrounding functional health.  People have insecurity and that is an internal dialogue of LACK. A misinterpretation of our interactions with the world. If we want to feel better about ourselves, we have GOT to pay attention to what we think of ourselves.


The change starts during that communication of Lack...NOT when you feel bad if an outside judgment joins your internal conversation…


The self hate model of judgment needs to stop and that starts inside.


I love you and you should love you toooooo.


E


fear

Fear.


This past couple of weeks have been some of the most challenging weeks of my life from my motherhood and business point of view.


I have been extremely exposed...fear of pain and uncertainty for my child, emotional pain of seeing as a business owner, other not fun business lessons,  bike accidents, sick kids, new staff, and an up and coming expansion…


A lot of unknowns and my ego getting ripped up and anxiety triggers of unrealistic understanding of reality…


All in a week.  And I’m not in a great place.  I’m actually pretty freaked out...and yet through all of my irrational responses to moments of uncertainty, I knew I needed to reset.  So I’m writing to you.


In fact, most of my newsletters are not inspired by problems around me, but imbalances within.


I certainly have a high level of resilience.  High level of fighting through the ease of comfort, but sometimes life does get the best of me and I get pretty bummed and then I bouce back.  I try not to be stuck in my understanding of the presence and move forward when it is clear that the irritations of lessons are invisible high school English teachers...Poking you to analyze, revise, read more closely, and say it without excess.


English teachers always gave me much more than simply learning the art in the English language, so I played with this idea of grappling with emotional responses and our ability to reflect.


Like I said...analyze, revise, read more closely, and say it without excess.


Analyze what really is happening.  It is YOU. Completely. You can’t know others the way you know yourself and if that means leading with empathy instead of self imposed confusion then do that.  Your fear can make you self preserve instead of grow. Shift to growing. Shift to finding your loving response to yourself and others.  


Revise how you are responding...PLEASE FEEL.  Discomfort is a lesson, however, revise what that discomfort is making you do.  Find a diffuser. Neutralize pain’s power over your perception of reality. Break it up.  Read a book. Walk. Recognize that action unless love filled will not work as quickly or effectively in the long run.


Read more closely to your wisdom.  You know way more than you think, but rarely do you really trust intuition of love.  We can be impulsive. Full of fear. Inactive. Angry. Mean. But, that isn’t the complexity of your influence in the world or in yourself.  Ride the wave of endorphins when you feel like you have found a truth. Feel warm when you problem solve.  


Then when you find a solution say it without excess.  Don’t fill your head or those around you with pomp and circumstance...just find the words after the pain is felt.  Simplicity and being concise is the best way to communicate complexity...to yourself and to others.


Rinse and repeat =)


Do you have other ways?


E


30 Days of Uncertainty

30 Days of uncertainty!


The next 30 days I would like you to focus on uncertain moments and how you handle them.  


What is uncertainty to you?

Why is it so bad?

Why is it so uncomfortable?

Aren’t all things uncertain?

Who are you to know?

Is control a necessity to peace?

When have you known for sure that you were balanced and perfect?

Have you ever been?

How have you developed your sense of expectations, goals?

Why have you?


This is just a start, but a worthwhile thought exercise to tear open some understanding of the impossibility of perfection and certainty.


Prove them wrong!

Erin


Teamwork Bloomington Testing Breakdown

Teamwork Bloomington Testing Breakdown

At Teamwork Bloomington, we test our athletes ~five times per year in a battery of tests measuring vertical jump, change of direction, linear speed, total body strength, and mobility/body control.  Below you can read about each of our tests and what these tests measure.

Vertical Jump — The king of measurements for basketball players, the vertical jump reflects increases in relative strength and ability to produce force.

Ground Contact Time — This measurement goes hand-in-hand with vertical jump and reflects how quickly an athlete is able to get off of the floor once they put force into the ground.  When you look into the ground contact time of collegiate athletes, their ground contact times are shockingly similar.

Pro Agility Test — This test involves sprinting five to ten yards and rapidly changing direction.  If your child plays a court sport, a great deal of success depends on ability to change direction without losing control.

75 foot sprint — This straight-line sprint reflects the greatest average distance on a basketball court that a player could sprint during play.  

Trap Bar Deadlift — This is a strength movement that has a near-perfect positional relationship to that of vertical jump.  The trap bar deadlift also does the best job of covering a wide variety of strength qualities, from hip, back, and leg strength to core stability under great load.  

Max Chin-Ups — Similar to that of the deadlift, there is a great correlation between the chin-up and total body strength development.  For a chin up to count, the athlete must reach full extension of the arms at the bottom, and touch their chest to the bar at the peak.

Active Straight Leg Raise (ASLR) — This is a movement testing lower body control and flexibility of the hamstrings.  The ASLR allows us to determine whether an athlete should be permitted to deadlift, as well as whether an athlete’s training should be biased toward unilateral (single leg) training as opposed to bilateral training (both legs at once).

Trunk Stability Push Up (TSPU) — The TSPU is a push up that puts the athlete in a disadvantageous position and requires them to complete a single push up without the body breaking a straight line from head to toe.  A requirement of training and sport that many athletes fail to possess is that of core stability. If an athlete cannot control his or her abdominals and hips, there is simply no chance that an athlete can be efficient on the court or field.

Deep Squat — The deep squat is a mobility test performed while holding a rod overhead.  The Deep Squat highlight mobility of the ankle, as well as the upper back and shoulders.  In general, the vast majority of athletes lack ankle mobility, putting them at risk for sprains, inefficient movement, and decreased power in the vertical jump. Many throwers also tend to lack upper back mobility, which can place greater stress on the arm and shoulder over time.


6-Packs and Athleticism: Social Media vs Reality

6-Packs and Athleticism: Social Media vs Reality

Check out our video on training abdominals here!

One of the most frequently asked questions from our athletes is how to achieve the six pack abs that are seemingly everywhere you look.  Unfortunately, this thought process is focussed solely on the visual and very little on the abdominal strength required to move heavy loads and change direction more efficiently.  In reality, there are 3 separate layers of abdominal musculature that play different roles in stability and athleticism. The three layers in order of discussion are the rectus abdominis, the obliques, and finally the transverse abdominis.  As you read on, consider your own views on abs and whether your way of thinking is helping you to meet your athletic goals.

The first layer of abdominals is referred to as the Rectus Abdominis (RA).  These muscles are the “washboard abs” that so many dream of having. The primary role of the RA is to flex the spine (think about your typical sit-up or crunch).  While the RA plays a small role in preventing extended posture (bubble butt), their larger role in athletic performance is relatively small. In fact, the visual appeal of these abs is primarily achieved through nutrition. With that said, visible ridges in your abs can be symbolic of your body fat percentage, which may need to change depending on your sport’s requirements.  While a football-playing offensive lineman and a cross country athlete may be polar opposite in appearance, it does not mean that the runner has strong abs.

While the rectus abdominis makes up the most clearly visible layer of the abs, the obliques come in as a close second.  The obliques are comprised of an outer, external layer, as well as an internal layer below them with muscle fibers running in the opposite direction.  This “X” shape created by the obliques plays a significant role in supporting the spine and allowing us to stand upright. The obliques also provide stability during side bending and rotation of your torso.  When your coaches talk about getting 360-degree expansion with you brace, the obliques make up a big portion of the area you are trying to fill with air. The obliques work in conjunction with the third layer of the abs, the transverse abdominis, to create intra-abdominal pressure (the pressure you create with your breathing), the most important aspect of athletic stabilization.

The final, and arguably the most important layer of the abdominals is the transverse abdominis.  The TA sits deepest inside the body and refers to the muscles we are trying to activate when your coach tells you to brace against a belly breath or shrink your ribcage.  There is a part of the TA below each of the muscles mentioned above, almost acting as the glue the holds everything else together. While this layer sits deepest into the body and is therefor invisible to the naked eye, it’s proof that there is far more to strong abs than the stereotypical beach body.  

There exists a saying in the athletic world that proximal stability will allow for distal mobility.  What this technical expression means is that if your abs are stable, you allow for your hips, shoulders, and everything farther away from the middle of your body to function optimally.  If you as an athlete can learn to breath and brace efficiently, you have the potential to move safely and become significantly more athletic. Stop worrying about the six pack and start thinking about the success you want on the court or field.

Reference Photos:

Rectus Abdominis: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/95/Rectus_abdominis.png/250px-Rectus_abdominis.png

Obliques and RA:

http://www.balancemotion.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/PicMonkey-Collage-300x211.jpg

Transverse Abdominis:

https://www.verywellhealth.com/thmb/acZh8HH7glUvQSp4P80dvsQ32ms=/768x0/filters:no_upscale():max_bytes(150000):strip_icc()/GettyImages-87307057-56a0601f3df78cafdaa14e0c.jpg