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bloomington personal trainer

permission to quit

I was listening to Rachel Hollis’ book, Girl, Wash Your Face.  Side--This book is great for people in romantic relationships. It is a great way to communicate and it is entertaining.  Highly recommend!


At the beginning of the book she discusses the promises we break with ourselves comparing it to trusting someone in your life who always breaks plans with you or seems to always over promise and underdeliver.  It begins to have a diminishing effect. You can’t trust. You can’t believe. You can’t assume. When this happens with yourself, what can you do?


Hollis likes to call our moments of tension as opportunities to quit.


She claims that when we decide to use our trained (comfortable) self to answer actions to hardships, we essentially are quitting.


That every excuse we make for ourselves is permission to quit.


She then movingly yells at the readers she would not give people permission to quite specifically when it comes to the challenges of self-care, dreams, and the road ahead towards change.


I am yelling too.


A lot of people think that I am missing mindfulness--especially working with young people and families.  That I am too hard. Have too many expectations. All unrealistic. That I don’t listen to the world around us telling us to stop pushing. 


But there are two types of energies when it comes to our dreams--ways to fuel and ways to progress.


Our fuel--our sense of self and fullness--comes in many different ways, most of which none of us care to engage with.  It’s our attention to our health. Our ability to ask for help. Identifying the isolating effect of perfection. Somehow self care has been disguised as inaction for fear of “busyness” and I call bologna.  Sense of self is recognizing your health and well being...not just stopping. It is foundational and it commands community. Identification of value--individually and collectively.  


On the flip--progress towards goals demands a maturity that embraces a little chaos.  A lot of trust in imperfection. A lot of discomfort. A lot of vulnerability.


IF we begin making excuses in ourselves, giving ourselves permission to not embrace the collective storytelling of progress, we will stagnate and become overwhelmed by our own self judgement.


YES.  Absolutely a problem.  


But finding enough love in yourself, those around you, and an attention to uncertainty that scares you a little...you are on the path of strength.


Stop giving yourself excuses and start giving yourself a community, a cup full of love, and the chip on your shoulder to try uncertainty.


E


30 Days of Self care

30 Days of self-care


What does self care look and feel like?  It feels like a warm feeling that comes when you matter to you and you do it often.


Misinterpretations that get a bad rep?


Weight as indicative of value

Inaction due to overwhelm

Cheat days as a way to not care about your goals 

Perpetual restarting as though a restart is different than just starting the day as YOU

Prioritizing as time is indicative of rest

Productivity is indicative of anxiety

Criticizing the world around as though it somehow is the only catalyst of challenge


I found this great calendar which I am sharing at the top of the page and I think it is so important to be deeply aware of your self care.  


Are you loving yourself, approaching yourself as special and important?  Or are you building your self care with the idea that you are somehow not complete?


I think there is a misconception of the fitness industry...that somehow it builds on the perpetuity of negative self image, but that is a small part of the negativity surrounding functional health.  People have insecurity and that is an internal dialogue of LACK. A misinterpretation of our interactions with the world. If we want to feel better about ourselves, we have GOT to pay attention to what we think of ourselves.


The change starts during that communication of Lack...NOT when you feel bad if an outside judgment joins your internal conversation…


The self hate model of judgment needs to stop and that starts inside.


I love you and you should love you toooooo.


E


Knee Pain

Athlete: “My knee hurts.”


Coach: “Can you show me where?”


Athlete: Motions generally at entire knee.


Coach: “Can you rate your pain out of ten?”


Athlete: “I don’t know how to do that.”


Coach: “How long has it been bothering you?”


Athlete: “Since I tried to put my foot behind my head this morning.”


One of the most common concerns shared by parents, athletes, and coaches alike is pain.  Obviously, physical pain is a sign that something is not working as it should. However, not all pain is created equal.  Pain is a part of sport, and understanding this sentiment begs the age old question of being injured versus being hurt. If an athlete’s perceived pain is below a three out of ten, odds are they can work around it or perhaps even work out of the pain within a training session.  If pain is severe, we can back off and work around the issue until more information is gathered by a healthcare professional. The most important thing to realize if you are an athlete experiencing pain is that consistently working to become healthy will always trump taking time off.


When it comes to pain, a simple question you can ask your athlete is whether their pain is a product of injury (sharp, impossible to work around) or exertion (difficult training session, fatigue, or even a dull, nagging ache).  Especially in our increasingly sedentary world, young athletes are having an increasingly difficult time understanding whether the pain they are in is worth acknowledging as a serious issue. For those of you concerned parents, here are a few things you might consider before taking your child in for an MRI.


  1. Is your child in the middle of a growth spurt?

  2. Is your child sitting excessively? Sitting during the school day alone can make the hips extremely tight.

  3. Has your child recently experienced a rapid change in physical activity?

  4. Is your child taking care of their soft tissue? Stretching and foam rolling areas such as the calves, hamstrings, hip flexors, and glutes can make a huge difference in helping with knee and low back pain.

  5. Is your child eating and sleeping enough?  Under-recovering can have a huge impact on overall health and perceived pain.

  6. Is your child wearing poor fitting or new/old shoes?  Our feet are our connection to the world and if they are put in a poor position, so is everything from the ankle up.

  7. Is pain an opportunity for your child to gain attention or escape a prior commitment?  While this may sound harsh, I’m sure many of us can agree our children are far smarter than we give them credit for.  


Hopefully this checklist will provide you with some peace of mind as it relates to caring for your child as an athlete.  Pain is absolutely a subject that needs to be taken seriously, but that also means it is the athlete’s responsibility to try and understand his or her body.  While we can do everything in our power to stop it, pain is still a part of life. If it weren’t for pain, we wouldn’t be as grateful as we are for good health.  Will you allow pain to control you, or will you treat it as an obstacle to overcome?



Seth Eash


6-Packs and Athleticism: Social Media vs Reality

6-Packs and Athleticism: Social Media vs Reality

Check out our video on training abdominals here!

One of the most frequently asked questions from our athletes is how to achieve the six pack abs that are seemingly everywhere you look.  Unfortunately, this thought process is focussed solely on the visual and very little on the abdominal strength required to move heavy loads and change direction more efficiently.  In reality, there are 3 separate layers of abdominal musculature that play different roles in stability and athleticism. The three layers in order of discussion are the rectus abdominis, the obliques, and finally the transverse abdominis.  As you read on, consider your own views on abs and whether your way of thinking is helping you to meet your athletic goals.

The first layer of abdominals is referred to as the Rectus Abdominis (RA).  These muscles are the “washboard abs” that so many dream of having. The primary role of the RA is to flex the spine (think about your typical sit-up or crunch).  While the RA plays a small role in preventing extended posture (bubble butt), their larger role in athletic performance is relatively small. In fact, the visual appeal of these abs is primarily achieved through nutrition. With that said, visible ridges in your abs can be symbolic of your body fat percentage, which may need to change depending on your sport’s requirements.  While a football-playing offensive lineman and a cross country athlete may be polar opposite in appearance, it does not mean that the runner has strong abs.

While the rectus abdominis makes up the most clearly visible layer of the abs, the obliques come in as a close second.  The obliques are comprised of an outer, external layer, as well as an internal layer below them with muscle fibers running in the opposite direction.  This “X” shape created by the obliques plays a significant role in supporting the spine and allowing us to stand upright. The obliques also provide stability during side bending and rotation of your torso.  When your coaches talk about getting 360-degree expansion with you brace, the obliques make up a big portion of the area you are trying to fill with air. The obliques work in conjunction with the third layer of the abs, the transverse abdominis, to create intra-abdominal pressure (the pressure you create with your breathing), the most important aspect of athletic stabilization.

The final, and arguably the most important layer of the abdominals is the transverse abdominis.  The TA sits deepest inside the body and refers to the muscles we are trying to activate when your coach tells you to brace against a belly breath or shrink your ribcage.  There is a part of the TA below each of the muscles mentioned above, almost acting as the glue the holds everything else together. While this layer sits deepest into the body and is therefor invisible to the naked eye, it’s proof that there is far more to strong abs than the stereotypical beach body.  

There exists a saying in the athletic world that proximal stability will allow for distal mobility.  What this technical expression means is that if your abs are stable, you allow for your hips, shoulders, and everything farther away from the middle of your body to function optimally.  If you as an athlete can learn to breath and brace efficiently, you have the potential to move safely and become significantly more athletic. Stop worrying about the six pack and start thinking about the success you want on the court or field.

Reference Photos:

Rectus Abdominis: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/95/Rectus_abdominis.png/250px-Rectus_abdominis.png

Obliques and RA:

http://www.balancemotion.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/PicMonkey-Collage-300x211.jpg

Transverse Abdominis:

https://www.verywellhealth.com/thmb/acZh8HH7glUvQSp4P80dvsQ32ms=/768x0/filters:no_upscale():max_bytes(150000):strip_icc()/GettyImages-87307057-56a0601f3df78cafdaa14e0c.jpg