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jump higher bloomington indiana

30 Days of Self care

30 Days of self-care


What does self care look and feel like?  It feels like a warm feeling that comes when you matter to you and you do it often.


Misinterpretations that get a bad rep?


Weight as indicative of value

Inaction due to overwhelm

Cheat days as a way to not care about your goals 

Perpetual restarting as though a restart is different than just starting the day as YOU

Prioritizing as time is indicative of rest

Productivity is indicative of anxiety

Criticizing the world around as though it somehow is the only catalyst of challenge


I found this great calendar which I am sharing at the top of the page and I think it is so important to be deeply aware of your self care.  


Are you loving yourself, approaching yourself as special and important?  Or are you building your self care with the idea that you are somehow not complete?


I think there is a misconception of the fitness industry...that somehow it builds on the perpetuity of negative self image, but that is a small part of the negativity surrounding functional health.  People have insecurity and that is an internal dialogue of LACK. A misinterpretation of our interactions with the world. If we want to feel better about ourselves, we have GOT to pay attention to what we think of ourselves.


The change starts during that communication of Lack...NOT when you feel bad if an outside judgment joins your internal conversation…


The self hate model of judgment needs to stop and that starts inside.


I love you and you should love you toooooo.


E


Teamwork Bloomington Testing Breakdown

Teamwork Bloomington Testing Breakdown

At Teamwork Bloomington, we test our athletes ~five times per year in a battery of tests measuring vertical jump, change of direction, linear speed, total body strength, and mobility/body control.  Below you can read about each of our tests and what these tests measure.

Vertical Jump — The king of measurements for basketball players, the vertical jump reflects increases in relative strength and ability to produce force.

Ground Contact Time — This measurement goes hand-in-hand with vertical jump and reflects how quickly an athlete is able to get off of the floor once they put force into the ground.  When you look into the ground contact time of collegiate athletes, their ground contact times are shockingly similar.

Pro Agility Test — This test involves sprinting five to ten yards and rapidly changing direction.  If your child plays a court sport, a great deal of success depends on ability to change direction without losing control.

75 foot sprint — This straight-line sprint reflects the greatest average distance on a basketball court that a player could sprint during play.  

Trap Bar Deadlift — This is a strength movement that has a near-perfect positional relationship to that of vertical jump.  The trap bar deadlift also does the best job of covering a wide variety of strength qualities, from hip, back, and leg strength to core stability under great load.  

Max Chin-Ups — Similar to that of the deadlift, there is a great correlation between the chin-up and total body strength development.  For a chin up to count, the athlete must reach full extension of the arms at the bottom, and touch their chest to the bar at the peak.

Active Straight Leg Raise (ASLR) — This is a movement testing lower body control and flexibility of the hamstrings.  The ASLR allows us to determine whether an athlete should be permitted to deadlift, as well as whether an athlete’s training should be biased toward unilateral (single leg) training as opposed to bilateral training (both legs at once).

Trunk Stability Push Up (TSPU) — The TSPU is a push up that puts the athlete in a disadvantageous position and requires them to complete a single push up without the body breaking a straight line from head to toe.  A requirement of training and sport that many athletes fail to possess is that of core stability. If an athlete cannot control his or her abdominals and hips, there is simply no chance that an athlete can be efficient on the court or field.

Deep Squat — The deep squat is a mobility test performed while holding a rod overhead.  The Deep Squat highlight mobility of the ankle, as well as the upper back and shoulders.  In general, the vast majority of athletes lack ankle mobility, putting them at risk for sprains, inefficient movement, and decreased power in the vertical jump. Many throwers also tend to lack upper back mobility, which can place greater stress on the arm and shoulder over time.