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sport performance

30 Days of Uncertainty

30 Days of uncertainty!


The next 30 days I would like you to focus on uncertain moments and how you handle them.  


What is uncertainty to you?

Why is it so bad?

Why is it so uncomfortable?

Aren’t all things uncertain?

Who are you to know?

Is control a necessity to peace?

When have you known for sure that you were balanced and perfect?

Have you ever been?

How have you developed your sense of expectations, goals?

Why have you?


This is just a start, but a worthwhile thought exercise to tear open some understanding of the impossibility of perfection and certainty.


Prove them wrong!

Erin


finally...

Finally...the first version of my Journal.


About a year ago I created a planner and journal for my clients and members to use, and the first version is finally here.  Download a print off by responding with “yes, please” and enjoy my strategy on feeling a comprehensive sense of progress when it is easy to get distracted on where we are not.


I think dreaming and reminding ourselves of all of our “parts” is essential to our truth.  Deficit thinking, while productive, has an effect on our spirit. Many times, there is a lot happening that is amazing, but we look at what is NOT currently indicative of our effort, our dreams, our strengths and this somehow defines our entire life for the moment.  


No amount of self talk can take us out of stress mode when we define our entire life based off of a moment of change or uncertainty.


So recognize ALL your parts.  Write down in an accompanying journal what makes you feel the most energized.


Next I have “personal dreams.”  These are my ideals for how I want to feel progress for myself (professional, personal).


Self Care dreams are my ideals for caring for myself.  I include exercise, movement, nutrition, stress breakers, etc.


Family is how I interact with my family and how we develop our own plans and presence.


Travel is a personal love of mine.  I like to be out of my element to keep a complex sense of truth inside of my head.  It keeps me pleasantly unclear.


Talents and creativity are meant to be for the individual that has an art that they love!  Reading, writing, playing an instrument, speaking, language, craft, etc. Keep this a part of you!!  Boredom happens when we lose aesthetic and creative challenge.


Thoughts on society is healthy as it keeps my perspective in check.  Social media makes people seem mean and I think to maintain a sense of love towards life, you can’t write out the world.  You have to find empathy and authority balance. This would be a place for that monthly reflection and outlet.


Ideal day is how I would structure my time to feel complete.  Where my attentions would go. How I would use my energy. Monthly assessment is a necessity.


My Ideal Connection is most important.  The energy you use is the energy you make.  




Finally, I include reflection.  SO MUCH REFLECTION and explanation.  You can’t know your effect without truly thinking about it.  Do it all the time. Write about what has happened and how it changed you and vice versa.


This is a work in progress, but something finally put together.


Fear first, right?


I think creating a monthly way to see yourself comprehensively is interesting and a way to pass down your authenticity =)


Enjoy.


E


At Home Arm Care For Youth Athletes

Arm Care for the Baseball or Softball Athlete

 

It’s that time of year, folks.  Baseball/Softball season is going strong and athletes are feeling the aches and pains that accompany all of their throwing.  Before long, an athlete who isn’t taking care of himself will likely complain of a rotator cuff that feels more like beef jerky than strong, athletic muscle.  Fortunately, a proactive athlete can keep the majority of these nagging issues at bay.  Through rigorous foam rolling and dedicated training on the small group of muscles that maintain shoulder stability, there is no reason an athlete should break down over the course of a season.

 

The simplest action an athlete can take in preventative care is dedicated use of a foam roller or ball.  If you lack a roller at home, you can use a softball, tennis ball, or even a golf ball to relax inflamed or “knotted up” tissue. By placing a ball against a wall and leaning into it, you can cover the area where the shoulder meets the outer chest, the deltoid (the round mass on the outside of the shoulder), and more importantly, the posterior side of the body.  

 

When rolling out the back, it’s important to pay attention to the musculature surrounding the shoulder blade.  Typical hot spots in overhead athletes include the area between the shoulder blade and the spine (middle of the upper back), as well as the meat below the armpit and the back portion of the shoulder itself, known as the posterior deltoid.  By taking care of these general areas and performing additional arm care, a great deal of the risk associated with throwing can be averted.  Please note that when foam rolling, you should not roll on top of the shoulder blades or the armpits themselves, as you could potentially do damage to the underlying tissues or lymph nodes. 

 

The above areas are likely to be tender in athletes who are in season or have recently increased their pitch count.  It is important to remember that when foam rolling tissue, you should do your best to relax into the ball or roller.  By remaining tense, you diminish the effects of foam rolling.  If you are simply unable to relax, try using a tool that is less dense.  For example, it is rare that I can tolerate a golf ball around my shoulder blades, but a tennis ball does wonders.  

 

Now that we have addressed mobility, we can also discuss stability and strengthening of the shoulder girdle.  The shoulder is by far the most mobile joint in the body.  While this allows us more function as humans, there is a cost.  A mobile joint suffers from greater risk of injury.  The more capacity for movement, the more likely something is to go wrong.  If the musculature surrounding the shoulder girdle is not strong enough to absorb the repetitive trauma of max effort throwing, an athlete is placed at greater risk of injury.  If you are looking for some sample exercises to cover stability through the majority of shoulder range of motion, please see this video.  Just as stated in the video, it should be noted that these movements are best performed with lighter weights or minimal band tension.  Controlling the shoulder blades can be difficult for young athletes who are still developing body awareness, but moving with intent is vastly more important than moving heavy weight in these small muscle groups.

 

While the information above may seem as though it is a lot to digest, an athlete who takes his or her time to complete this body care on a regular basis is only looking at 10-15 minutes of work.  The exercises mentioned above are all easily accomplished at home, and the foam rolling can be performed while watching television or lounging around before bed.  Just like studying for a big exam, the individual who partakes in smaller, more focused bouts of arm care will be better prepared for any test that stands in their way.

 

For those of you interested in the benefits of self massage and foam rolling, we at Teamwork Bloomington are fortunate to have the aid of Sports Massage Therapist Leisa Parks, who not only offers her services regularly, but also holds tissue health classes around the first week of every month.  Stay tuned on social media for posts about upcoming dates.  For more about Arm Care, please feel free to contact Teamwork Bloomington.

By: Seth Eash